Posts Tagged ‘Podiatrist Cairns’

Bursitis of the back of the heel

Friday, October 15th, 2021

Retrocalcaneal bursitis is an inflammation of the bursa located between the calcaneus (heel bone) and anterior (front) surface of the Achilles tendon. Bursa are fluid filled sacs and can be found all over the body. Their main function is to reduce friction between tendons and bone. Bursitis refers to an inflammation of the bursa and can result in significant pain, swelling and often redness. 

There are two bursitis locations in relation to the heel:

  • Anterior (infront) the achilles tendon, between the achilles tendon and calcaneus Retrocalcaneal bursa
  • Posterior (behind) to the achilles tendon, between the skin and the achilles tendon Subcutaneous bursa

How did I get it?

Retrocalcaneal bursa is commonly  caused by repetitive trauma or overuse, and is aggravated by pressure. Retrocalcaneal bursitis may be caused by impingement of the bursa between the achilles tendon and a prominent posterior aspect of the calcaneus, Haglund’s deformity. 

  • Overtraining
  • Tight or poor fitting shoes leading to excessive pressure at the posterior heel
  • Haglund’s Deformity 
  • Poor foot posture (e.g. flat feet that roll in)
  • Tightness through the calf muscle and achilles

Key characteristics

  • Pain at the back of the heel, exacerbated when running uphill. 
  • Pain may worsen when standing on tiptoes.
  • Tenderness/swelling at the back of the heel. 
  • Increased pain in activities which load the calf muscle e.g. jumping.

How is it diagnosed?

Retrocalcaneal Bursitis is generally diagnosed through a thorough history and examination. In order to exclude other pathology e.g. damage to the achilles tendon itself, imaging may be recommended such as ultrasound or MRI. 

How do we treat retrocalcaneal Bursitis at FNQ Podiatry & Orthotics?

Possible Treatments:

  • Anti-inflammatories
  • In-shoe padding
  • Footwear modifications
  • Moon Boot
  • Custom foot orthotics
  • Moderated rest
  • Cortisone injection
  • Taping

How long will it last?

Recovery from Retrocalcaneal is very much dependent on patient compliance. It can be a debilitating condition however if treated aggressively early with the above treatment options, recovery can be within as little as 2-3 weeks.
If you think you may be suffering from bursitis in the heel, give our friendly team a call today to book an initial appointment on 4045 5749, or book online at https://fnq-podiatry-orthotics.cliniko.com/bookings#location

 

5 Step guide to reducing Achilles Tendon pain

Thursday, October 14th, 2021

Are you suffering from pain at the back of your heels, particularly when you get up to walk from resting? Chances are, you are suffering from Achilles tendinopathy. Achilles tendinopathy is a common overuse injury that we see at FNQ Podiatry & Orthotics. It is often due to a sudden increase in exercise or a change in training technique Common symptoms associated with Achilles tendinopathy are pain directly on the back of the heel, stiffness and pain first thing in the morning or just after rest and in some cases, some swelling may be seen around the area. We are currently seeing an influx patient’s experiencing Achilles tendinopathy due to new exercise regimes. Here is a 5-step simple guide to help settle your pain and help you return to exercise.

5 step guide for reducing pain at the back of your heel or achilles tendon

1. Rest

  • As tendinopathy is an overuse injury, moderated rest can be the best thing for it in the short-term.

Moderated rest focuses on activity modification rather than complete rest.. e.g avoid hill running or sprint training and focus on strength work, cycling or low intensity runs but with increased frequency. E.g. rather than doing one long 10-20km run/week, do 2-3x 5kms runs/week.

2. Ice packs 

  • Grab some frozen peas or some Ice cubes from the freezer and wrap it in a tea towel and apply directly to the site.
  • Application can lead to suppressing the associated inflammation.
  • It is essential to not apply for a long period of time as this can cause more harm than good! We recommend 5-10 minutes. Repeat at least 3x daily for the first week.

3.Footwear

  • It is important to avoid causing more tension throughout the Achilles. The most common mistake people have when rehabilitating an Achilles injury is being barefoot or in flat thongs around home.
  • We recommend wearing a pair of joggers as they have a slight heel inbuilt. This shortens the Achilles length taking unwanted tension and pain away from your heel. Ladies, if possible, wear a 2-3cm wedge around the house, particularly first thing in the morning – this will make an immediate difference

4. Warm up before getting up!

  • First step pain when you wake up in the morning is by far the most common symptom of achilles tendinopathy
  • To reduce the severity of the first step pain, we recommend using a towel to pull your toes back towards you while laying in bed. Hold the stretch for 20 seconds and repeat 3x. 


5.Strengthen the Achilles

  • It is important to strengthen the Achilles to allow it to function in day-to-day life. If we return to activity without proper rehabilitation it can cause further injury and set you back even further.
  • The first exercise  we recommend is calf hold. This is done by going onto your tip-toes (80% of maximum height off the ground) and holding for thirty seconds. Do this 3x in the morning, 3x at lunch and 3x in the evening. If the pain is too much, reduce the load by doing seated calf raises.

 

If you are still having issues with pain at the back of your heel, give us a call and we will be happy to help! We offer several treatment options including exercise programs, custom foot orthotics, dry needling/massage, taping and shockwave. If you are currently isolated at home, we offer telehealth services for those that cannot attend physical appointments and give you our expert advice on how to settle pain quickly and get you back doing what you love.

We are open and taking appointments. Call our friendly team on 40 455 749 or book online at www.fnqpodiatry.com.au

 

5 Step guide to reducing forefoot pain

Wednesday, October 6th, 2021

Have you started suffering from pain in the ball of your foot? Here is a simple 5-step guide that can help, all from the comfort of your home!

It is amazing how many patients we are seeing at the moment who are suffering from pain in the balls of their feet. Since the start of the Covid-19 restrictions, everyone’s daily routine has been flipped on its head, with most of us now spending a lot more time at home. 

Naturally, being Far North Queenslanders, there is nothing better than kicking off our shoes and walking around on our tiles or timber floors bare foot. Until that is, you start to develop pains through the balls of your feet that you have never experienced before! All of a sudden, simple activities such as walking to the bathroom or standing up to cook dinner, become a lot more difficult. Don’t put up with this pain any longer. Here is a simple 5-step guide that you can work on at home to help settle your pain and get you back doing what you love ASAP!

1. Wear cushioned shoes:

  • Yes, we understand that you want to be bare foot but we guarantee that this will help to improve your symptoms. The more cushioning you can get under your feet for the short-term, the quicker your symptoms will settle. This isn’t a life sentence either. Think of it as a short-term treatment option to allow you to get back to being bare foot quicker!

2. Stretching:

  • Stretching your calf muscles and the muscles under your arches will help to improve your fore-foot pain. Tightness through these muscles leads to altered walking patters and results in increased pressure being placed through the balls of your feet. \

3. Massage under your arches and balls of the feet:

  • If you can’t convince your other half to help (good luck!), get some massage cream and work along the muscles of the arch and balls of the feet. You can also use a tennis ball or massage ball by placing them on the ground and slowly rolling your foot across it.

4. Towel scrunches:

  • Lay a towel out on the ground in front of you. While sitting down at a chair, put your feet on the towel, shoulder width apart. Scrunch up the towel with your toes, hold for 1 second and release. Repeat this 20-30 times. Rest for 1min and repeat another 3-4 times. This will help to strengthen your arch muscles and make your feet more resilient. 

5. Icing

  • Create an ice slushy in a bucket and place the balls of your feet in there for 5-10 mins. Repeat twice daily. This will help to settle down any inflammation.

If your forefoot pain does not improve with the above steps, be sure to see us at FNQ Podiatry & Orthotics to determine whether something else is contributing to your pain.

Our clinical locations all remain open and are contactable on 40 455 749 or online at www.fnqpodiatry.com.au. If you are unable to make it into one of our clinics, we are offering telehealth consultations where we can assess your symptoms and provide further advice

Do my running shoes need replacing?

Wednesday, October 6th, 2021

Identifying when your running shoes may need replacing is far from an exact science, however there are a number of factors which contribute to the lifespan of a shoe and how to tell if they are past their use by date. 

The general rule of thumb when it comes to this question is based on mileage; how many kilometers have you travelled in the shoe? Although it is still quite a large range, the accepted distance is 600-1000km’s. In saying this, having an awareness of each of the other contributing factors will give a much more accurate gauge of if it’s time to chuck, donate or relegate. 

Below are a list of the few key considerations; 

    • Shoe type – A minimalist style or racing shoe will have a shorter life span then a standard runner. This is due to slightly less cushioning and support to reduce shoe weight. 
    • Gait pattern/ running style – For example, if you are a forefoot runner, you may get less life from your shoe as the shock is not being dispersed over as large a surface area and is concentrated to one area of the shoe. This also applied is you are a significant over pronator as this will compress the medial shoe structure quicker, especially if you are not wearing a posted shoe. 
  • Physical signs of wear and tear 
      • Outsole – Observe areas of excessive wear on the tread. This is can also tell a story as to whether you are wearing the correct shoe for your biomechanics. 
      • Midsole – The midsole is hard to evaluate through sight, however the main sign this is wearing out is the shoe does not feel as responsive or bouncy as it used to. Trying a new shoe on may make this easier to identify. The bent shoe test (below) can be used to evaluate the midsole integrity. 
      • Upper – Look for general signs of wear and tear. 
  • Bent shoe test – The bent shoe test is used to assess midsole integrity. Hold the shoe one hand around the fore foot and one around the rearfoot and heel counter. Apply a bending pressure through the middle of the sole – if the shoe easily folds here it is a sign there is a loss of support and structure. 
  • Pain/injury – Finally, a major indicator of shoe wear is pain or injury. If an old pain returns or new pains start it can be a good idea to consider how long you have been wearing your shoe. Replacing your footwear before you reach the 600km mark and then interchanging them for the last few months can be a great idea to reduce injury risk. 

 

If you are unsure whether your shoes are still appropriate, or in assessing your shoe notice an unusual wear pattern, the podiatrist is able to do a thorough assessment of your biomechanics and provide shoe recommendations or further treatment advice as required. Call our friendly reception team today on 4045 5749 or book an appointment online here. https://fnq-podiatry-orthotics.cliniko.com/bookings#location

Why are my toenails going black?

Tuesday, September 28th, 2021

Discoloured toe nails are one of the most common presenting complaints we have in our Podiatry clinics across Far North QLD. As a general rule, the discolouration is secondary to bruising from previous trauma to the nail. The trauma results in bleeding under the nail and as the blood has nowhere to escape, it becomes trapped, dries out and can remain there for sometime. The severity of trauma can vary from a simple stub of the toe against the bed leg (we can all relate to this!) or to the extent of a crush injury.

So what if your toenail has become black and you can’t remember any incidents? Chances are, this is related to your footwear. Shoes that are too big big or small can also cause repeated trauma to your nails. If your shoes are too big, the extra room in the shoe allows your foot to slide in the shoe and hit the end. If your shoes are too small, your foot doesn’t have room to slide and repeatedly hits the end of the shoe. This is a common issue that we see in runners across our clinics, particularly those running long distances. 

Here are some important FAQ’s regarding black toenails:

  • If my toenail is black, does it mean it is dead?

As a general rule, one traumatic incident to the nail, isn’t enough to ‘kill it’. This only occurs after repeated trauma to the nail and the root. The damaged nail will likely fall off and a new one will grow underneath to replace it. 

  • If I am certain there has been no trauma to the nail, what else could it be?

If this is the case, we strongly recommend a consultation at one of our Podiatry clinics in Cairns. Although uncommon, skin cancers can develop under the nail so further assessment may be required. Particularly given the climate that we live in and the higher incidence of skin cancers. 

  • How do I tell if the black nail is fungal?

As a general rule, a fungal infection under the nail results in a white/yellow discolouration rather than a dark one. The nail will also often have a brittle appearance. If you would like to be sure, consult one of our Podiatry clinics in Cairns and one of our friendly Podiatrists will conduct a thorough assessment of the nail.

  • Will I lose my toenail if it is black?

This really depends on the severity of the damage and the amount of bleeding under the nail. If mild, the pressure from the dry blood generally isn’t enough to cause the nail to lift. However, if the trauma is significant, the amount of bleeding results in the nail lifting from the bed (if it hasn’t already from the trauma) and will slowly fall off.

  • What can I do to reduce the risk of my nail falling off after trauma?

The best way to reduce the risk of nail damage and pain, is to consult a Podiatrist within the first 48hrs of the injury. The treating Podiatrist will be able to drain some of the blood out from underneath the nail, hence reducing pressure and improving comfort significantly. Ice application can also be beneficial as it can close the capillaries and hence reduce the severity of the bleeding. 

 

If you have a black toenail that is causing pain or you are concerned about, be sure to see us at one of our Cairns Podiatry clinics for an assessment. Appointments are readily available online at www.fnqpodiatry.com.au or call on 40 455 749

Why are my feet and toes itchy?

Tuesday, September 28th, 2021

A very common condition that at some point or another have is, especially in FNQ, where it is quite humid and hot to say the least is: Athlete’s foot

Athlete’s foot (tinea pedis) is a fungal infection that usually begins between the toes. It commonly occurs in people whose feet have become very sweaty while confined within tight fitting shoes.

So, what is it?

These are the most common features:

  1. Athlete’s foot usually causes a scaly red rash. The rash typically begins in between the toes. Itching is often the worst right after you take off your shoes and socks.
  2. Some types of athlete’s foot can feature blisters. The moccasin variety of athlete’s foot causes chronic dryness and scaling on the soles that extends up the side of the foot. It can be mistaken for eczema or dry skin.
  3. The infection can affect one or both feet and can spread to your hand — especially if you scratch or pick at the infected parts of your feet.

How did I get it?

There are a few causes associated with Tinea and a few things we will ask you when you have an appointment with us, and they are:

  1. Athlete’s foot is caused by the same type of fungus that causes ringworm and jock itch. Damp socks and shoes and warm, humid conditions favour the organisms’ growth.
  2. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be spread by contact with an infected person or from contact with contaminated surfaces, such as towels, floors and shoes.
  3. Frequently wear damp socks or tightfitting shoes
  4. Share mats, rugs, bed linens, clothes or shoes with someone who has a fungal infection
  5. Walk barefoot in public areas where the infection can spread, such as locker rooms, saunas, swimming pools, communal baths and showers

How do I get rid of it?

One can treat about 90 percent of patients with tinea pedis with topical antifungal medications only, such as Lamisil or Canestan. These are over the counter topical medications, however stronger preparations are available upon script from the GP if warranted. 

 

We like to treat the cause, as with everything, so how do we prevent this from re-occuring?

  1. Nails should be clipped short and kept clean. Nails can house and spread the infection.
  2. Avoid walking barefoot in locker rooms or public showers (wear sandals).

For control of athlete’s foot infection, persons with active tinea pedis infection should:

  1. Keep feet clean, dry, and cool.
  2. Avoid using swimming pools, public showers, or foot baths.
  3. Wear sandals when possible or air shoes out by alternating them every 2-3 days.
  4. Avoid wearing closed shoes and wearing socks made from fabric that doesn’t dry easily (for example, nylon).
  5. Treat the infection with recommended medication.

If you are worried you may have a tinea infection, give our friendly team a call 4045 5749 or book your initial consultation online today.

 

5 Step guide for helping shin pain

Friday, September 17th, 2021

Have you started running more recently and started to develop shin pain? Chances are, you are probably suffering from shin splints! 

Here is our simple 5-step guide that you can work on at home to try and settle your symptoms and get back into running!

What are shin splints?

  • Shin splints are a common over-use injury.
  • They develop when the muscle and bone tissue (periosteum) in the leg become overworked by repetitive activity.
  • Shin splints often occur after sudden changes in physical activity. Changes in frequency, such as increasing the number of days you exercise each week. Changes in duration and intensity, such as running longer distances or on hills, can also cause shin splints. There are a lot of people currenting ticking these boxes with the Covid-19 government restrictions!
  • Other factors that contribute to shin splints include: Flat/pronating feet, ill-fitting footwear and excess weight.

Shin splint symptoms generally involve the following:

  • Sharp/razor-like at the start of activity that warms up. Post activity, symptoms change to a dull ache along the inside or front borders of your shins
  • Tenderness with palpation along the symptomatic area
  • Pain while resting at night is generally not present and if this is the case, may suggest that stress fractures are involved. 

 

5-step guide to improving your shin pain:

1.Stretching and releasing your lower leg muscles, particularly your calves:

  • Try and include every muscle from your knee down, including; gastrocnemius (top aspect of calf), soleus (lower aspect of calf), tibialis anterior (runs along the front of your shin) and tibialis posterior (runs along the inside of your shin).

2. Foam roller work along the aforementioned muscle groups. Yes, it will be painful but trust us – it will help!

3. Gentle self-massage with use of Anti-Flamme cream – to further decrease inflammation in the region. Useful particularly before getting into bed at night. 

4. Rock taping techniques- Application, tape is anchored without stretch on the outside of the foot.  The tape is then pulled under the arch to the inside ankle bone (medial malleolus) with quite a bit of stretch (70-80%), then ease off the stretch back to 30-40% as the tape is laid along the inside of the shin, with no stretch for the last inch.  A decompression strip can then be applied over the area of most pain, usually a 5-10cm above the inside ankle bone (medial malleolus). This is done with “band aid” technique, using a 10cm length of tape, with the backing paper ripped in the middle, stretched to 80% over the area of pain, with no stretch on either end.  Rub the tape to generate heat and activate the glue. Make sure the tape is applied an hour before running.

5.Supportive footwear/insoles – to help reduce mechanical stress, reduce muscle fatigue, and improve lower leg shock absorption

If your shin splints do not improve with the above steps, be sure to see us at FNQ Podiatry & Orthotics to determine whether something else is contributing to your leg pain.

Our clinical locations all remain open and are contactable on 40 455 749 or online at www.fnqpodiatry.com.au. If you are unable to make it into one of our clinics, we are offering telehealth consultations where we can assess your symptoms and provide further advice

How do I tell if my running shoes need replacing?

Friday, September 17th, 2021

Identifying when your running shoes may need replacing is far from an exact science, however there are a number of factors which contribute to the lifespan of a shoe and how to tell if they are past their use by date. 

The general rule of thumb when it comes to this question is based on mileage; how many kilometers have you travelled in the shoe? Although it is still quite a large range, the accepted distance is 600-1000km’s. In saying this, having an awareness of each of the other contributing factors will give a much more accurate gauge of if it’s time to chuck, donate or relegate. 

Below are a list of the few key considerations; 

  • Shoe type – A minimalist style or racing shoe will have a shorter life span then a standard runner. This is due to slightly less cushioning and support to reduce shoe weight.
  • Gait pattern/ running style – For example, if you are a forefoot runner, you may get less life from your shoe as the shock is not being dispersed over as large a surface area and is concentrated to one area of the shoe. This also applied is you are a significant over pronator as this will compress the medial shoe structure quicker, especially if you are not wearing a posted shoe. 
  • Physical signs of wear and tear 
      • Outsole – Observe areas of excessive wear on the tread. This is can also tell a story as to whether you are wearing the correct shoe for your biomechanics. 
      • Midsole – The midsole is hard to evaluate through sight, however the main sign this is wearing out is the shoe does not feel as responsive or bouncy as it used to. Trying a new shoe on may make this easier to identify. The bent shoe test (below) can be used to evaluate the midsole integrity. 
      • Upper – Look for general signs of wear and tear. 
  • Bent shoe test – The bent shoe test is used to assess midsole integrity. Hold the shoe one hand around the fore foot and one around the rearfoot and heel counter. Apply a bending pressure through the middle of the sole – if the shoe easily folds here it is a sign there is a loss of support and structure. 
  • Pain/injury – Finally, a major indicator of shoe wear is pain or injury. If an old pain returns or new pains start it can be a good idea to consider how long you have been wearing your shoe. Replacing your footwear before you reach the 600km mark and then interchanging them for the last few months can be a great idea to reduce injury risk. 

 

If you are unsure whether your shoes are still appropriate, or in assessing your shoe notice an unusual wear pattern, the podiatrist is able to do a thorough assessment of your biomechanics and provide shoe recommendations or further treatment advice as required. 

Hypermobility in Kids

Wednesday, September 1st, 2021

Do you ever look at your child pushing and bending their bodies into all sorts of weird and wonderful positions and just think “OUCH!” Well, chances are their party tricks are unlikely to be causing them any physical pain at all. Children and adolescents with generalised joint hypermobility (GJH)  have joints which can move beyond the normal limits and into an extra range of movement, much like rubber bands. While joint hypermobility in children is quite common, with the most prevalent cause falling under the banner of benign joint hypermobility, there are other quite rare underlying causes which can be linked to genetic syndromes such as Ehlers Danols Syndrome or Marfans Syndrome.

Muscle pain, joint instability, recurrent injury and early muscle fatigue can all be signs attributed to joint hypermobility, with the knee and ankle two of the most commonly affected joints. When a joint is subjected to increased and ongoing instability, the surrounding muscles are required to ‘over work’ in an attempt to create stability. However, in doing this the muscles will contract too frequently and at incorrect times within the gait cycle therefore becoming overused and inefficient leading to pain. 

So what can a podiatrist do to help? Firstly, a targeted exercise program is key to improving muscular strength and endurance. The stronger the muscles through your core and lower limbs the higher tolerance to stress they provide therefore decreasing injury frequency and severity. At FNQ Podiatry and Orthotics we use a highly regarded exercise prescription program, Physitrack, which is not only individually customised but has video demonstrations of each exercise to assist kids in complying and completing their exercises correctly.
Secondly, improving lower limb biomechanics and joint alignment through proper footwear and if required, custom foot orthotics has proven to be enormously beneficial in reducing short term pain while long term minimising ongoing joint trauma and muscle overload. 

Our podiatrists are all educated to assess joint hypermobility under the most current guidelines and grading programs to ensure accuracy and consistency in our results and treatment programs.

 

 

Foot Maintenance Program

Wednesday, September 1st, 2021

Feet are the foundation of our bodies and play an important part of a happy, healthy lifestyle. The foot is an engineering masterpiece consisting of 26 bones, 33 joints, and over 100 muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Its unique design allows the foot to handle hundreds of tons of force every day. 

The average adult takes 4,000 to 6,000 steps per day. That’s enough steps to walk around the earth four times during your life. When you consider the weight and stress, we place on our feet each day, it’s easy to see how approximately 80% of people will experience a foot related problem at some point during their life.

Most people forget (not us!) about the feet and that it must be strengthened and maintained just like any other structure in the human body. 

Here are our 4 steps to remaining pain free and with happy feet:

Step 1: Tennis Ball Massage 

  1. Using a tennis ball or golf ball
  2. Begin seated, with the ball positioned underneath the heel of your foot
  3. Roll the ball from the heel towards the ball of your foot and back, in a slow repetitive movement
  4. Apply a moderate amount of force from your foot onto the surface of the ball so that it creates a mild discomfort

Note: If you experience a sharp shooting pain you may be applying too much pressure, and will need to reduce how hard you are pushing on the ball

Frequency:

  • Perform for 5 minutes at a time
  • Repeat 3 x day

Progression:

  • Perform the exercise whilst standing 
  • Same action and repeat repetitions
  • Increase to 4-5 x day as well as before and after exercise

Step 2: Toe raise, point, and curl

There are three stages to the toe raise, point, and curl.

This exercise has three stages and will help to strengthen all parts of the feet and toes.

To do this exercise:

  • Sit up straight in a chair, with the feet flat on the floor.
  • Keeping the toes on the floor, raise the heels. Stop when only the balls of the feet remain on the ground.
  • Hold this position for 5 seconds before lowering the heels.
  • For the second stage, raise the heel and point the toes so that only the tips of the big and second toes are touching the floor.
  • Hold for 5 seconds before lowering.
  • For the third stage, raise the heel and curl the toes inward, so that only the tips of the toes are touching the floor. Hold this position for 5 seconds.
  • Build flexibility and mobility by repeating each stage 10 times.

Step 3: Toe extension

To do this exercise:

  • Sit up straight in a chair, with the feet flat on the floor.
  • Place the left foot on the right thigh.
  • Pull the toes up, toward the ankle. A stretching feeling should be felt along the bottom of the foot and heel cord.
  • Hold for 10 seconds.
  • Massaging the arch of the foot while stretching will help ease tension and pain.
  • Repeat this exercise 10 times on each foot.

Step 4: Calf stretches

The Achilles tendon connects the heel to the calf muscles. It can strain easily, and keeping it flexible may help with foot, ankle, or leg pains.

To do this exercise:

  • Face a wall and raise the arms, so that the palms rest flat against the wall.
  • Place one foot back, keeping the knee straight. Then bend the knee of the opposite leg.
  • Keep both heels flat on the floor.
  • Push the hips forward, until the Achilles tendon and calf muscles can be felt stretching.
  • Hold for 30 seconds before switching sides. Repeat three times on each side.
  • For a slightly different stretch, bend the back knee and push the hips forward.